LJDC Monthly Meeting – 2/22

La Jolla Democratic Club Newsletter
February 2022
The LJDC Monthly Zoom Meeting, 7 pm
Thursday, February 10th, 2022
Please Note New Time for the LJDC Monthly Zoom Meetings!
We will meet on the 2nd Thursday of the month, at 7 pm. See you then!
The Executive Board voted to change our meeting date from the second Sunday of the month to the second Thursday evening of the month because this would be more convenient for candidates who are running this election year.  Numerous candidates have expressed an interest in attending our meeting to seek our endorsement or simply to introduce themselves and present their platform.

At the upcoming meeting on February 10th, we will be considering an endorsement for our member of Congress in the 50th District. Scott Peters is the incumbent and his district has been changed from 52 to 50 as a result of the recent redistricting of all districts. Congressman Peters is being opposed in the June primary election by Adam Schlindler,a molecular and cell biologist and Kylie Taitano, a software engineer.

The by-laws of the La Jolla Democratic Club require that club members be notified 2 weeks in advance of any meeting where candidate endorsements will be considered. You must be a member to vote. Consider this your notice that endorsements will be considered at the next meeting and—along with Congress—may include School Board, San Diego County Assessor, City Council and State Legislature (Senate and Assembly).

Below is the Zoom link and Password and Meeting ID for the Zoom meeting.
Looking forward to a great turnout! —Derek Casady, Club President

LJDC Monthly Meeting – January 2022

January 2022
The LJDC Monthly Meeting
Thursday, January 13th
7 pm

Please Note New Time for the LJDC Monthly Zoom Meetings!
We will meet on the 2nd Thursday of the month, at 7pm, starting tomorrow on the 13th of January, 2022. See you then!

For the January program we have invited Kelly Martinez and Dave Meyers, candidates for San Diego County Sheriff, to make presentations about their campaigns and their platforms so that the La Jolla Democratic Club may decide if the Club wants to endorse either or both of them in their race for San Diego County Sheriff.

Also present at the meeting will be Kylie Taitano, a software engineer at Intuit, who is a candidate in the June Primary Election for Congress in the 52ndDistrict where Scott Peters is the incumbent. The La Jolla Democratic Club will not be considering an endorsement in this race until probably in February.

To join a LJDC Zoom Meeting use this Recurring Link:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83628705292?pwd=ejdMWlVGYXY1S3I0cXZZZmpHTFpFUT09

Meeting ID: 836 2870 5292
Passcode: 940538

LJDC Monthly Meeting – December 2021

LJDC Monthly Meeting – December 2021
The December program will be on the New Political Redistricting Plans for the City, County and U.S. Congress. 

cody pettersenCody Petterson, La Jolla resident, member of our club and candidate for San Diego Unified School District Board of Trustees will be our presenter on the redistricting plans.

Cody, a graduate of La Jolla High School, got his BA in English at UC Berkeley, then a Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing at the Iowa Writers Workshop, one of the finest writers’ workshops in the world, at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, and his PhD in anthropology at UCSD.
FYI: At our January meeting our club will be considering Endorsements for County Sheriff, and San Diego Unified School District Board of Trustees, and perhaps others.  Any candidate seeking endorsement by our club will have been notified, along with their competitors, at least five days in advance of the meeting.

Also we hope to have Dave Meyers, Commander (ret) and  Undersheriff Kelly Martinez, both candidates for sheriff, debate at our club meeting in January.

donkey
2022 – It’s time again to RENEW your LJDC Membership.
Simply go to http://www.lajollademocrats.org/membership/ and renew online.

Or you can download a Membership Form and return it with a check payable to LJDC.
PO Box 288, San Diego, CA 92038

LJDC Monthly Meeting – November 21

Our speaker for Nov. 14th will be Jason Bercovitch, Director of Constituent Services for Congressmember Scott Peters.

The subject of Jason’s talk will be a defense of Congressmember Peters’ opposition to  President Biden’s plan to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices. At our October meeting a motion/resolution (*see below) was made to condemn Peters for his opposition to the Biden plan for drug price negotiations, and Doug Case, of Senator Toni Atkins’ office, said he thought Peters should have a chance to explain his views on drug price negotiations before the club voted on the motion/resolution.

Jason has been on Peters’ staff since 2013, is a graduate of UC Riverside, with a BA in business and managerial economics, and is a graduate of Rancho Bernardo High School.
Questions from club members will follow Jason’s presentation.


*Resolution about Scott Peters’ that the club will vote on in November:
Whereas, President Biden has proposed a plan to lower prescription drug prices for all Americans, including giving Medicare the power to negotiate drug prices to save the treasury over $450 billion, and
 Whereas the $450 billion in savings could be put towards providing child care and senior care, along with fighting climate change, and
 Whereas, US Representative Scott Peters voted counter to the principles of the Biden Democratic party agenda
and against the Biden prescription drug proposal, after receiving over $800,000 from “Big Pharma” industry members, therefore
Be it resolved that the San Diego County Democratic Party condemns the actions of Representative Peters that are counter to President Biden’s efforts to make prescription drugs more affordable for all.

The subject of Jason’s talk will be a defense of Congressmember Peters’ opposition to  President Biden’s plan to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices. At our October meeting a motion/resolution (*see below) was made to condemn Peters for his opposition to the Biden plan for drug price negotiations, and Doug Case, of Senator Toni Atkins’ office, said he thought Peters should have a chance to explain his views on drug price negotiations before the club voted on the motion/resolution.

Jason has been on Peters’ staff since 2013, is a graduate of UC Riverside, with a BA in business and managerial economics, and is a graduate of Rancho Bernardo High School.
Questions from club members will follow Jason’s presentation.

Our second item of business will be the election of club officers for 2022. Prior to the election a report by the nominating committee will be given by chairperson Pattie Petterson. Other members of the committee are Paula McCormack and Paul Maschel.

LJDC Book Recommendation – Nov 21

This Month’s Book Recommendation by Paula McCormack, VP

DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS:  How To Discuss What Matters Most
by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, Sheila Heen
Penguin Books; Illustrated edition (November 2, 2010) 352 pages

 In all of our personal and professional lives, “sticky” situations abound. By that, I mean any time two or more people have an overt or obscure conflict which should be addressed. We’ve all learned that the right way to handle these incidents is through good communication. We’ve been advised, rightly so, not to be too timid or aggressive, but to assert our position confidently and respectfully while listening to the other side’s.
Easy, right? It makes sense, and is based upon sound communication theory and psychology. Then why is it still so hard to approach some of these conversations, whether we’re mildly uncomfortable or really stressed out about it? Worse still, why don’t they run as smoothly as they’re supposed to?
The authors, all associated with the Harvard Negotiation Project, are experts in illuminating why we cringe, what’s really at stake, and most importantly providing a framework for creating conversations with a different angle. They call them “learning conversations”, as participants are encouraged to bring curiosity to the interaction, as opposed to our typical defensive stance. Of course, this is greatly simplified, but it is essentially the difference between our usual approach (beginning with one side’s complaint about the other) and this structure. The emphasis is not so much on what we do, as what we THINK.. As the authors state, “Regardless of context, the things that make difficult conversations difficult and the errors in thinking and acting that compound those difficulties, are the same. We all share the same fears and fall into the same few traps.” From this comes a rich array of detailed methods that can be put to use in any number of circumstances. The key, to me, is putting judgments and pre-conceptions aside (with the emotions that come from them), and really being interested in understanding what the other person is thinking, feeling and intending. That’s where the element of curiosity comes in, as opposed to holding self-righteous assumptions.
Some problems don’t resolve well, for many reasons that impede healthy interactions among people. But the work that is represented in this highly practical little book gives us a better chance to be successful in resolving disputes or bringing up difficult topics for discussion. It’s an excellent reference to be used as often as needed, and reviewed just as frequently to keep up the skills.
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LJDC Monthly Meeting – October ’21


The LJDC Monthly Meeting
Sunday, October 10, 2021
2 – 4:30 pm

Our speaker will be Terra Lawson-Remer, San Diego County Supervisor.

lawson remer

Terra Lawson-Remer is a third-generation San Diegan, who served as Senior Advisor in the Obama Administration developing environmental policies to cut pollution from oil drilling and mining.
As an economist with the United Nations and World Bank, she worked around the world to create jobs, restart businesses, and generate economic activity after a crisis.  As an educator and local Community College Advisory Board member, Terra teaches public policy and mentors disadvantaged students. And as a small businesswoman, Terra understands firsthand the challenges facing the business community during the COVID-19 crisis. 
She will be speaking on current issues before the San Diego County Board of Supervisors where she is a member of the new Democratic majority.

LJDC Executive Board Nominating Committee
A nominating committee has been selected, consisting of Patty Petterson as chairperson, along with Paula McCormack and Paul Maschel. This group will take additional nominations before the election of LJDC board at the November meeting. So far, all current officers are running for reelection:  Derek Casady, president; Paula McCormack and Fred Randel, vice presidents; Nancy Casady, treasurer and MaryLu Brandwein, secretary. To nominate yourself or another member for the board, call, text or e-mail Patty Petterson at 858-354-4910 or ppetterson@gmail.com.

Follow the directions below to join the Zoom meeting.
Questions or comments please call 858-457-0246 or email Derek at dcasady@outlook.com
Hope to see you on Sunday, October 10th at 2pm.  
LJDC Zoom Meeting
Topic: La Jolla Democratic Club Zoom Meeting
Time: October 10, 2021 02:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

To join the LJDC Zoom Meeting with your Web Browser use this link:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81978829313?pwd=M1cvSGFzNjF0VXJaTm9tZVVwdzRCZz09

Meeting ID: 819 7882 9313
Passcode: 114622

If you prefer to dial in with your phone use this number and enter the following ID and Password when prompted:

1 (669) 900 9128
Meeting ID: 819 7882 9313
Passcode: 114622

LJDC Monthly Book Recommendations – October ’21

This Month’s Book Reviews by Marcia Bookstein

War Is A Force That Gives Us Meaning
by Chris Hedges
Anchor; Reprint edition (June 10, 2003) 224 Pages
 The end of the Afghanistan war made me think of Chris Hedges’ book, War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning.  In the Wikipedia article about him it says that the New York Times fired him. Not exactly true.  He worked for the New York Times as a war correspondent in much of the world, including countries in South America as well as Eastern Europe. He wasn’t exactly towing the line that the Times wanted him to, so understanding the undercurrent of discontent that the publisher had, quit before he was fired.  (This has happened to others, including Sy Hersh who uncovered the My Lai massacre.) What’s memorable about this book is the detail he gives. He looks under the blankets covering the dead and wounded, searches for files and photographs in bombed out government buildings, is right there where the bullets are flying, writing what he sees and not mincing words. Don’t eat while you’re reading this book.  

Whenever I start a book I look at a random page or two in the middle first to see what the writing style is like. I’m a slow reader, and it’s not worth my time unless the writing is impeccable. Hedges’ writing is gorgeous. Not as blissful as Noam Chomsky’s, but up there in the “excellent” atmosphere. He takes you right there in the country before the conflagration, during, where you meet people and stay with them while they mourn their killed loved ones, and after, with the country changed and divided. He explains the reasons for this particular war in Serbia and Croatia, and the permanent animosities that arise because of mass manipulation and corrupt government. A lesson for the aware.
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menakemMy Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies
by Resmaa Menakem
Central Recovery Press; Illustrated edition (September 19, 2017) 300 Pages
I’m also reading My Grandmother’s Hands by Resmaa Menakem.  It’s a beautifully, compassionately written book, and I’m reading it with my daughter, Emily. We have book club every other week and discuss two chapters together.  She is the quintessential anti-racist, and was there in Portland protesting with Black Lives Matter, getting tear-gassed, dancing with a group to the tune of bicycle spokes being plucked, and witnessing and experiencing the kindness of strangers, the brutality of the police. Menakem is an acolyte of Bessel Van Der Kolk, an eminent psychiatrist who studied PTSD for over forty years. (“The Body Keeps the Score” is his book, which I’ve also read and highly recommend.)  Our bodies are key to how we can face and dissolve the trauma from racism.  And we all have it, even when it goes back five hundred years in our land of origin.  We’ve all been chased out of somewhere by a warring group of people, whether the Huns, the Germans, the Vikings, the  Spaniards, the early Hebrews, the Romans.  It goes on and on, doesn’t it?  And we’ve all been part of the aggressors.  Is this part of the human condition?  (This is something that Hedges’ addresses at some length.) But it’s not a great way to live and thrive, and Menakem is here to tell us how to heal, and to help put us in the other person’s shoes.  He has chapters for Black people, white people, and blue people (the police).  It’s an amazing experience to  put yourself in someone else’ shoes, not just mentally and psychologically, but physically as well–in our imaginations.  Which is where we learn most things–in our minds. 
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chomskyWho Rules the World? (American Empire Project)
by Noam Chomsky
Picador; Reprint edition (May 2, 2017) 336 Pages
The other book I’m reading concurrently is Who Rules the World, by Noam Chomsky. If you love ice cream, his writing is like the most refreshing and delicious ice cream–your favorite flavor.  If you’re not keen on ice cream then it’s creme brulee. Just incredible writing, with added fun snark and a soupcon of sarcasm here and there. In 1947 the US was in a position to take over the path that the world would take in the future, and grabbed that possibility. There’s a reason we have over 800 bases all over the world, and our military is the most aggressive and developed, let alone the private military in the form of Eric Prince’s company. (Is it still called Xi? Used to be Blackwater.) He has chapters on Israel and what happened during negotiations with the PLO, all the details that went into what’s happening there now, Cuba and the missile crisis during Kennedy’s administration and how close we came to destroying ourselves, our animosity towards the Russians, difficulties we have with Asia, North Korea, China, and the origins of those difficulties.  It turns out that we are responsible for much of the upheaval in the world.  (A good movie is Coup53, about Kermit Roosevelt and the overthrowing of the democratically elected Mosadegh.) Our dealings with Iran are also included.  It’s important to know the truth, to know the different sides of our history, and not just what the white supremacists want included in our history books. America might be great, but you might need to define “great”.  We are a powerful nation, but the bodies of innocent people murdered because of our deeds are numerous.  Yes, 9/11 just passed, but the 9/11 of 1973 (our involvement in overthrowing Allende in Chile) is addressed in this book, as well as the facts of our own 9/11.  And then the subsequent wars with Iraq and Afghanistan, including the prison in Guantanamo. The book is grave, saddening, enlightening, and deliciously written, which makes it palatable.  Highly recommended.
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LJDC Monthly Meeting – September

La Jolla Democratic Club Newsletter

September 2021

The LJDC Monthly Meeting
Sunday, September 12, 2021
2 – 4:30 pm

PROGRAM: The organization Feeding San Diego will give us a presentation on Food Scarcity in San Diego.  

Here is some of their history:
As one of the newest hunger-relief organizations in the Feeding America network, Feeding San Diego’s first distribution was held on October 9, 2007 in the parking lot at San Diego Rescue Mission. Several weeks later, San Diego County suffered from disastrous firestorms that displaced hundreds of thousands of individuals. In the first week of the fire with only two employees, Feeding San Diego secured and delivered 515,000 pounds of emergency supplies, including food, water, and other grocery items, to evacuees, firefighters, and volunteers. Now Feeding San Diego has about 70 employees, supported by donations, including $100,000 from Jeff Bezos.

Special thanks to Red Cross, Salvation Army, Father Joe’s Villages, Catholic Charities, Rock Church, San Diego Rescue Mission, Homeland Security, FEMA, City of San Diego, County of San Diego and other nonprofit agencies who supported our efforts during the firestorms and early stages of our development.

In February of 2008, Feeding San Diego moved into a 30,000 square-foot warehouse to better serve families in need. Later in 2010, the organization relocated to a new 50,000 square-foot distribution center in Sorrento Valley and quickly emerged as the leading hunger-relief organization in the county the following year. In September 2020, amid the global COVID-19 pandemic, Feeding San Diego moved into a new facility with enhanced capability to serve the community.

Follow the directions below to join the Zoom meeting.
Questions or comments please call 858-457-0246 or email Derek at dcasady@outlook.com
Hope to see you on Sunday, September 12th at 2pm.

 
LJDC Zoom Meeting

Topic: La Jolla Democratic Club Zoom Meeting
Time: September 12, 2021 02:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

To join the LJDC Zoom Meeting with your Web Browser use this link:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81834616052?pwd=MWowOHNVa1FybE9NUDQyUWVONUN5dz09

Meeting ID: 818 3461 6052
Passcode: 723592

If you prefer to dial in with your phone use this number and enter the following ID and Password when prompted:

1 (669) 900 9128
Meeting ID: 818 3461 6052
Passcode: 723592

LJDC Book Recommendations – September

This Month’s Book Recommendation by Paula McCormack, VP

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion
by Jonathan Haidt
‎ Vintage; Illustrated edition (February 12, 2013) 528 Pages
 “Politics and religion are both expressions of our underlying moral psychology, and an understanding of that psychology can help to bring people together.” (Haidt) Jonathan Haidt is a social scientist who researches moral psychology, and this book, his latest, invites serious study and discussion (remember highlighting, note-taking, thinking deeply and reviewing it all? Get ready!)
However daunting that may sound, Haidt’s writing style is engaging, accessible and endlessly fascinating. He provides summaries after each chapter, recognizing the depth and complexity of what he’s covered. For instance, have you ever tried to analyze an ethical dilemma rationally, and found that you still have a “gut” sense of something being wrong or immoral, despite reason to the contrary? Have you been flummoxed by how liberals and conservatives can view the same event so differently? What framework informs our moral judgments? How does our righteousness create blindspots that we can’t imagine having? And, in a broader sense, what factors constitute the “glue” that allows some societies/groups to flourish, while others fail?
Whoa. This book is well worth reading (and studying!) for anyone who is “ready to trade in anger for understanding” (cover blurb). Jonathan Haidt clearly adds to our understanding of the predicament of polarity in which we find ourselves these days.
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LJDC Book Recommendation – August

This Month’s Book Recommendation by Paula McCormack, VP

After The Fall
by Ben Rhodes
Random House (June 1, 2021)384 Pages
 Dear fellow members,
I absolutely LOVED this book! For those of us who have been struggling to comprehend what is happening in America, Ben Rhodes offers a deeply personal, insightful analysis of the forces  which have impacted the political world since the end of the Cold War. He masterfully blends a cogent, academic review of these trends with the personal narratives of individuals who are grappling with the increase in authoritarianism in their countries. It is these stories, coupled with the author’s own, which makes this a fascinating look at this human journey, of which we are all a part. I found myself identifying with people across the globe, with different histories, different cultures, yet bonded by a passionate need for free, fair self-governance. He confronts America’s recent history squarely in the face, revealing how we’ve impacted the world.(and our own nation)..and it’s not always pretty. Rhodes remains optimistic through it all, as you can see in this quote from the book:
“To be born American in the late twentieth century was to take the fact of a particular kind of American exceptionalism as granted. In the span of just thirty years, this assumption would come crashing down. America is no longer a hegemon. THERE IS OPPORTUNITY IN THAT.(caps mine) To claim the mentality of the nation of outsiders, comprising every strand of humanity. To make capitalism about something more than money, to make national security about something other than subjugation, to make technology work better as a tool for human enlightenment. To learn from others around the world instead of thinking that it is always we who have something to teach them. After the fall, we must determine what it means to be American again.”
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