LJDC Monthly meeting – August

La Jolla Democratic Club Newsletter August 2021

The LJDC Monthly Meeting
Sunday, August 8, 2021
2 – 4:30 pm


Our speaker will be Denise Vedder, Director of Public Outreach and Conservation at San Diego County Water Authority

Vedder served as the department’s senior manager for 11 years before her appointment as director in 2018, leading two award-winning drought outreach programs during that period.

Before joining the Water Authority, Vedder was appointed as the first communications manager for the City of Carlsbad, where was responsible for designing and implementing a strategic communications plan and building the city’s outreach program from the ground up. Vedder also served two district attorneys as a public affairs officer. Vedder has a bachelor’s in journalism and political science from San Diego State University.

She will speak on the worst drought we have had in San Diego and the state of our water supply, followed by questions.


Follow the directions below to join the Zoom meeting.
Questions or comments please call 858-457-0246 or email Derek at dcasady@outlook.com

LJDC Monthly Meeting – July

The LJDC Monthly Meeting
Sunday, July 11, 2021
2 – 4:30 pm

steppe

Our speaker will be Councilmember Monica Montgomery Steppe. She grew up in the Fourth Council District, earning a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Spelman College and a Juris Doctor from California Western School of Law.
     She serves as chair of the Committee on Public Safety & Livable Neighborhoods. She also serves on the Committee on Budget & Government Efficiency and Active Transportation and Infrastructure.
     Her awards include: the  2018 Voice of San Diego Voice of the Year, the 2019 San Diego Democratic Party Making a Difference Award and the 2021 Ashley L. Walker Social Justice Award from Alliance San Diego.
       On August 22, 2020, Monica married the love of her life, Steven Steppe. She is the eldest daughter of Clifford and Patricia Montgomery. She is a niece, sister, and a proud aunt.
     She will speak on some of the issues facing the City of San Diego, with questions to follow.

sdcwa
vedder

Our second speaker will be Denise Vedder, Director of Public Affairs at San Diego County Water Authority
Denise Vedder served as the department’s senior manager for 11 years before her appointment as director in 2018, leading two award-winning drought outreach programs during that period. Before joining the Water Authority, Vedder was appointed as the first communications manager for the City of Carlsbad, where was responsible for designing and implementing a strategic communications plan and building the city’s outreach program from the ground up. Vedder also served two district attorneys as a public affairs officer. Vedder has a bachelor’s in journalism and political science from San Diego State University.
    She will speak on the worst drought we have had in San Diego and the state of our water supply, followed by questions.

LJDC Book Recommendations – July

This Month’s Book Recommendation by Paula McCormack, VP

High Conflict
by Amanda Ripley
Simon & Schuster (April 6, 2021) 368 pages
 Many of us are feeling bewildered and powerless by the extreme polarization which has gripped our nation’s citizens as political differences have intensified. We ask, “How can they THINK like that?!” as we form tribes of “reds” and “blues”, each with a sense of superiority and righteousness. This “us vs. them” mentality threatens to poison our relationships with friends, other citizens and even family members.
Amanda Ripley, award-winning investigative journalist, has taken on the subject  of “high conflict” in her new book (by the same name).She clearly delineates the differences between toxic, all-consuming conflict in which losses outweigh any gains, and “good conflict”, which is healthy and necessary for change. Her primary focus is not on our current political situation, although it might have been an impetus for her. She explains the dangers of high conflict, its magnetic pull, and the difficulties in trying to extricate oneself from it. Specifically, the conflict itself takes over, becoming a quagmire within which reason dissolves into emotion, there is no room for complexity and it reduces nuance to broad categories (good vs. evil, right vs. wrong, us vs. them). Perspective is lost, and individuals meld into their “group”.
She offers expert advice on how to recognize high conflict in the world and in ourselves, and how to prevent it, by “creating a culture which is conflict resilient”. Ultimately, her book offers hope with practical solutions, some of which can be practiced by each of us individually. Good conflict is not the same thing as surrender, or even forgiveness. It maintains the dignity of all involved, while disagreeing, sometimes intensely. High conflict is destructive and demeans the other side. (It was easy for me to recognize key players, or what Ripley terms “conflict entrepreneurs”, in our current affairs, and how they exploit and inflame the situation.)
In my opinion, we Democrats have a lot of work to do to stave off the destruction of our democracy. I think that is a genuine threat, and we have to keep up the pressure to protect our rights and values. However, I would like to understand and connect more with other citizens who view things differently, if only to bring us out of this conflict, which is pitting us against each other. The essential quality in this effort is a WILLINGNESS to listen and learn. Obviously, there are many who have no such interest. But masses of people can change, and shift into more agreeable ways to disagree. This compelling book introduces the reader to the “understories” of high conflict, and some of the ways individuals and groups have moved out of it. I found it fascinating!

LJDC Book Recommendation – June

This Month’s Book Recommendation by Paula McCormack, VP

BLINDSPOT,  Hidden Biases of Good People
by Mahzarin R. Banaji and Anthony G. Greenwald
Bantam; Reprint edition (August 16, 2016) 272 pages
  Part of the extreme polarization that we Americans are experiencing today comes from unconscious biases, stereotypes and misperceptions. In BLINDSPOT, the authors refer to what they call “mindbugs”, which are the errors that are made, quite naturally, by ‘ingrained habits of thought that lead to errors in how we perceive, remember, reason, and make decisions” (Banaji, Greenwald). It’s important to note that we all develop these habits, as we compartmentalize, adopt attitudes from the social and cultural milieu in which we were raised, and are influenced by a host of other factors.
   The authors begin by introducing a clever visual illusion which will challenge and confound you even AFTER it is explained. From then on, I was hooked. Clearly, my interpretation of “reality” was off, and I loved trying to figure out why! That is the purpose of BLINDSPOT; to elucidate those processes, subconscious but accessible, which sabotage our thoughts and behavior. Through honest self-examination, and guidance from the data presented, we can take some control of our prejudices, even if we can’t completely eradicate them. 
   It’s a great first step toward connecting with “the other”, whomever that might be, by attempting to understand what underlies the passion behind our differences.
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LJDC Monthly Meeting – June

The LJDC Monthly Meeting
Sunday, June 13, 2021
2 – 4:30 pm


patriot millionaires

PROGRAM: TAX THE RICH / SAVE AMERICA ROADSHOWThe TAX THE RICH / SAVE AMERICA Roadshow features a lighting-quick (30 minutes) highly engaging, dynamic dissection of the current federal tax code. Topics include: How To Rig An Economy; Their Money v. Your Sweat; the Job Creator Myth; and much more.
PRESENTER: THE PATRIOTIC MILLIONAIRES
Proud “traitors to their class,” members of the Patriotic Millionaires are high-net worth Americans, business leaders, and investors who are united in their concern about the destabilizing concentration of wealth and power in America. The mission of The Patriotic Millionaires organization is to build a more stable, prosperous, and inclusive nation by promoting public policies based on the “first principles” of equal political representation, a guaranteed living wage for all working citizens, and a fair tax system.
More Info

LJDC Monthly Meeting

LJDC Monthly Meeting – May 2021

The LJDC Monthly Meeting
Sunday, May 16, 2021
2 – 4:30 pm

The Program will be:
Cody Petterson, La Jolla Democratic Club member, senior adviser to County Supervisor Terra Lawson-Remer and President of the San Diego County Democrats for Environmental Action, speaking on the new book, (See Below) “100% Clean,  Renewable Energy and Storage for Every Thing.” Written by civil and environmental engineering professor Mark Jacobson, at Stanford, this textbook lays out in amazing detail the plan for a United States’ Wind, Water and Solar Energy System to replace fossil fuels. This is very important because if we don’t end fossil-fuel burning, fossil fuels are going to end us. And time is running out.

clean energy

100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything
by Mark Z. Jacobson
Cambridge University Press; 1st edition (October 1, 1920) 450 pages
Numerous laws – including the Green New Deal – have been proposed or passed in cities, states, and countries to transition from fossil fuels to 100% clean, renewable energy in order to address climate change, air pollution, and energy insecurity. This textbook lays out the science, technology, economics, policy, and social aspects of such transitions. It discusses the renewable electricity and heat generating technologies needed; the electricity, heat, cold, and hydrogen storage technologies required; how to keep the electric power grid stable; and how to address non-energy sources of emissions. It discusses the history of the 100% Movement, which evolved from a collaboration among scientists, cultural leaders, business people, and community leaders.
Buy Your Copy Here


lori saldana

The second part of the program will be presented by former Assemblywoman Lori Saldana who will give us an update on the disturbing number of deaths in San Diego County jails and other police reform and social justice issues.

This Month’s Book Recommendations – May 2021

This Month’s Book Recommendations

100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything
by Mark Z. Jacobson
Cambridge University Press; 1st edition (October 1, 1920) 450 pages
Numerous laws – including the Green New Deal – have been proposed or passed in cities, states, and countries to transition from fossil fuels to 100% clean, renewable energy in order to address climate change, air pollution, and energy insecurity. This textbook lays out the science, technology, economics, policy, and social aspects of such transitions. It discusses the renewable electricity and heat generating technologies needed; the electricity, heat, cold, and hydrogen storage technologies required; how to keep the electric power grid stable; and how to address non-energy sources of emissions. It discusses the history of the 100% Movement, which evolved from a collaboration among scientists, cultural leaders, business people, and community leaders.
Buy Your Copy Here

The Peacemaker’s Code
by Deepak Malhotra
Deepak Malhotra (February 16, 2021) 498 Pages
This month’s selection for readers who would like a break from current affairs (and other weighty topics) is entitled The Peacemaker’s Code, by Deepak Malhotra, Harvard Business School. Professor Malhotra is an expert negotiator, advising CEO’s and governments around the globe in resolving serious conflicts. In this, his first novel, he deftly intertwines negotiating strategy with science fiction, and the result is a highly original blend. It’s expertly written and nearly impossible to put down. (Check out Amazon reviews…many of us felt the same way and were up all night reading it!) Well-developed characters, time shifts, ingenious problem-solving and cliff-hangers are immersed in a plausible, fascinating story which will keep the reader guessing to the end (hence, the sleepless nights). For those of you who are familiar with techniques of negotiation, the “teaching moments” will be obvious, and complement formal readings and lectures.  I enthusiastically recommend reading this book, after which you, like I, will crave anything he writes. — Paula McCormack
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LJDC Monthly Meeting – April 2021

La Jolla Democratic Club Newsletter

April 2021

The LJDC Monthly Meeting
Sunday, April 11, 2021
2 – 4:30 pm

TASHA

Our speaker will be Tasha Williamson, who last year became one of the first black women to run for San Diego mayor.

She is an expert on racial justice, police misbehavior, the need for police reform, and homelessness.

She is a co-founder of Hotel Vouchers 4 All, and active in the campaign to recall Councilwoman Jennifer Campbell in District Two.

Tasha will give us some of the highlights of her many years of work in the community. She is one of the most informed community workers active in San Diego today.

Follow the directions below to join the Zoom meeting.
Questions or comments please call 858-457-0246 or email Derek at dcasady@outlook.com
Hope to see you on Sunday, April 11th at 2pm.

 
LJDC Zoom Meeting

Topic: La Jolla Democratic Club Zoom Meeting
Time: April 11, 2021 02:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

To join the LJDC Zoom Meeting with your Web Browser use this link:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86784083370?pwd=Zkh5eGRpT3hWTzVWZ2xrOFRSaGRRQT09

Meeting ID: 867 8408 3370
Passcode: 476315

If you prefer to dial in with your phone use this number and enter the following ID and Password when prompted:

1 (669) 900 9128
Meeting ID: 867 8408 3370
Passcode: 476315

LJDC Book Recommendation -4/21

Ten Lessons For A Post-Pandemic World
by Fareed Zakaria
W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (October 6, 2020) 320 Pages
 Fareed Zakaria, noted columnist, author and CNN host, has applied his considerable intellect to examining the “emerging post-pandemic world”. His ability to formulate a perspective that is both abstract and practical is brilliant, and his work is hugely enlightening and thought-provoking. This compact little book abounds with insights and is wholly readable, almost as a handbook. It is a “must-read” as we begin to come out of the worst of this global disaster.
SEE MORE

LJDC Book Recommendations – 3/21

This Month’s Book Recommendations

Parable of the Sower
by Octavia E. Butler
Grand Central Publishing; Reprint edition (April 30, 2019) 368 pages
When global climate change and economic crises lead to social chaos in the early 2020s, California becomes full of dangers, from pervasive water shortage to masses of vagabonds who will do anything to live to see another day. Fifteen-year-old Lauren Olamina lives inside a gated community with her preacher father, family, and neighbors, sheltered from the surrounding anarchy. In a society where any vulnerability is a risk, she suffers from hyper-empathy, a debilitating sensitivity to others’ emotions.

Precocious and clear-eyed, Lauren must make her voice heard in order to protect her loved ones from the imminent disasters her small community stubbornly ignores. But what begins as a fight for survival soon leads to something much more: the birth of a new faith . . . and a startling vision of human destiny. More

The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together
by Heather McGhee
One World (February 16, 2021) 448 pages
Heather McGhee’s specialty is the American economy—and the mystery of why it so often fails the American public. From the financial crisis to rising student debt to collapsing public infrastructure, she found a common root problem: racism. But not just in the most obvious indignities for people of color. Racism has costs for white people, too.

It is the common denominator of our most vexing public problems, the core dysfunction of our democracy and constitutive of the spiritual and moral crises that grip us all. But how did this happen? And is there a way out? More

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